• The Complete Guide to Becoming a Musicpreneur: Using Networking, Social Media, and Digital Marketing to Enhance Your Career

    This blog post was originally presented as a live lecture on February 29, 2020 at Brandon University (Manitoba, Canada) during the 10th annual Brandon University Clarinet Festival hosted by Catherine Wood. What is a musicpreneur? A musicpreneur (musical entrepreneur) is a musician who can turn their skills, expertise, and opportunities into successful business ventures which can enhance their careers and from which others can benefit. What key qualities should a musicpreneur have? Ability to think outside the box. There are countless negative headlines claiming that there is no future for classical music. This isn’t true – there are more opportunities for musicians than ever, but careers are changing and look…

  • Canadian Clarinet Compositions

    Happy Canada Day! I’ve enjoyed my first year in this beautiful country as I complete my doctorate in Montreal. I’d like to celebrate this national holiday with a list of some works for clarinet by Canadian composers I’ve discovered during my time up north. By no means is this list comprehensive, so feel free to share your favorite Canadian clarinet compositions below! Violet Archer – Moods for clarinet and alto saxophone (Archer also wrote Soliloquies for B-flat and A clarinet, along with Crossroads for solo clarinet) John Beckwith – Fall Scene and Fair Dance for clarinet, violin, and strings Alan Belkin – Sonata No. 2 for clarinet and piano Stephen Chatman…

  • 9 Museums Every Clarinetist Should Visit

    Are you looking for a clarinet-themed getaway this summer? Here are some museums you and all your clarinet friends should check out: Musée des Instruments à Vent (La Couture-Boussey, France) – If you want to see an impressive collection of wind instruments (and who doesn’t?), this is your place. Musical Instruments Museum (Brussels, Belgium) – In addition to a wide assortment of historical musical instruments, this museum houses a bass clarinet by the instrument’s inventor, Adolphe Sax. Musée de la musique (Paris, France) – With over 1,000 objects in the permanent collection, this museum is sure to intrigue. (Make sure to hear a concert at the Philharmonie after your visit!) National Music Museum (Vermillion,…

  • The Musician’s Guide to Studying Abroad: How to Turn Your Dreams Into Reality

    Many musicians dream of one day studying abroad – to study with a certain teacher, experience different pedagogy, become fluent in another language, learn more about another culture, or just broaden their musical perspectives. But dreaming about studying abroad is where it ends for most people. I’m here to tell you how to turn your study abroad dreams into a reality. I’m an American clarinetist, and I’ve lived in 3 different countries and visited 30 countries (and counting!). I moved to Paris in August 2015 to study with Philippe Cuper at the Versailles Conservatory, where I received my master’s degree in Musique, interprétation et patrimoine (musical interpretation and cultural heritage).…

  • The Final Resting Places of Famous Composers

    Longtime readers should know me well enough by now to know that I have an interest in the macabre. When I’m not practicing my clarinet, I enjoy reading Stephen King, listening to scary stories on YouTube, and exploring cemeteries. Last year, I visited the graves of famous clarinetists around the world. In addition to clarinetists’ graves, I also had the opportunity to pay my respects to famous composers. Here are a few of the composers’ graves I have visited: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827). Wiener Zentralfriedhof – Vienna, Austria. Franz Schubert (1797-1828). Wiener Zentralfriedhof – Vienna, Austria. Richard Wagner (1813-1883). Wahnfried – Bayreuth, Germany. Bedřich Smetana (1824-1884). Vyšehrad Cemetery – Prague, Czech Republic. Johann Strauss…

  • The Bizarre Deaths of Historical Clarinetists

    You probably know by now that October is my favourite month. I love feeling the brisk chill in the air, indulging in sugary seasonal coffee drinks, and enjoying the magnificent foliage around me. But what I love most about October is Halloween – the scary stories, horror movies, and everything macabre. I have quite the lineup of all things spooky and clarinet-related, so gather ’round the virtual campfire as we celebrate Halloween, Jenny Clarinet style! Prepare to be spooked by the peculiar demises of these historical clarinetists: Anton Stadler (1753-1812) – You would think the celebrity garnished as “Mozart’s Clarinetist” would secure a cushy lifestyle, but that wasn’t the case for…

  • The Final Resting Places of Famous Clarinetists

    Happy Friday the 13th! To get into the Halloween spirit, I’ve been visiting cemeteries and researching the gravesites of famous clarinetists. This morbid fascination has led me to visit many of these graves during my travels. Visiting these musicians’ graves allows me to pay my respects to the people who have influenced so much of the clarinet’s history. History books only tell us so much, and it’s an amazing experience to visit the final resting places of people who had previously existed only on paper or in music. Here are some of the cemeteries in which famous clarinetists are buried. This will be an ongoing project which I will update…

  • My Second Year in Europe in 25 Photos

    My oh my, how the time does fly! It’s hard to believe that I’ve been in Paris for two years already! I’m so lucky to call Paris my adopted home, and I’d like to share some of my favorite photo memories of last year in Paris and beyond. Action shot during my performance of the Mozart Quintet, K. 581. This was taken at the pre-overture of La Seine Musicale. Visiting the René Magritte exhibition at the Pompidou Centre. Magritte is my absolute favorite artist, and I spent the better part of a day exploring the museum and exhibition. Performing the Tomasi Clarinet Concerto at the Fondation des Etats-Unis. I’m so happy…

  • 48 Hours in Amsterdam

    Ever since I moved to Paris, I’ve developed a severe case of wanderlust. The geographical proximity to so many amazing places combined with insanely cheap budget airlines have turned me into a travel addict, and I’m always thinking of the next place to visit. It’s common for me to peruse Google Flights (or SNCF Voyages if I’m looking into travel within France) while I have my morning coffee, and my friends here are used to my random outbursts (“I can fly to Stockholm for €45!) I went to Amsterdam for the first time last week, where I spent a jam-packed 48 hours exploring this beautiful city. Since my trip was so short, I made…